Slime Rancher 2 is an absolutely lovely start to a promising sequel preview

Slime Rancher 2 is an absolutely lovely start to a promising sequel preview

Over the years, the original Slime Rancher has grown into a fairly competitive and entertaining life sim. It’s hard not to fall in love with a colorful world full of cute slimes, but like anything, the time has come when you need to take a step into the future. Now with more powerful hardware that allows developers to create more dynamic and engaging worlds, creator Monomi Park has left Slime Rancher behind its sequel, Slime Rancher 2, which, while very similar in many ways, has Some major improvements. welcome.

Before I get into why this sequel is better than the original, it’s worth pointing out that Slime Rancher 2 is still an Early Access/Game Preview title, which means it doesn’t feel like Slime Rancher at the end of the development cycle Pack like the Lord. The core mechanics are also very familiar, and sometimes don’t really work as much as they’ve changed, but the new locations, new slime types, and various other items and objectives you’ll have to complete are different. Basically, if you go into this “work in progress” expecting something very big and very different, you’re going to be disappointed. If you’re looking for a captivating, joyful and harmless experience, this game is for you.

Slime Rancher 2 is just as fun as its predecessors. Easy to get started, easy to get started, the control scheme is simple, and the progress is intuitive. Granted, you sometimes need to get a little creative and even try slimes (which can sometimes lead to failure or confusion), all to simplify your gold income, improve your knowledge of the world, unlock new areas, or craft new miniatures. tool. I mean you need to farm and feed slimes in order to make money from Plorts (basically the dirt produced by slimes after eating them), slimes are for making money and being able to upgrade your infrastructure, whether it’s the history of upgrades Lyme fence with higher walls or automatic feeders, or improve the soil of the farmland you own. This may seem simple, but the basic farming dynamics change when you start to combine slime types and see how the characteristics of each change.

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This is on top of environmental puzzles to solve, which may be more of a physical feat requiring new tools to perform at their best (i.e. making a jetpack to safely traverse gaps), or more with the slime itself and you understanding of them. It all comes back to this, as the game revolves around learning and getting to know Rainbow Island’s slippery inhabitants.

Slime Rancher 2 is an absolutely lovely start to a promising sequel previewSlime Rancher 2 is an absolutely lovely start to a promising sequel preview
Slime Rancher 2 is an absolutely lovely start to a promising sequel preview

The Slime Rancher 2 has very little feel. On the one hand, it doesn’t need to exist because the game is inherently easy, but on the other, it’s because it prides itself on player choice. If you just want to make some slime shells filled with basic pink slimes, you can. But at the same time, if you want to explore the furthest parts of the island, you can use the correct Plort as a key to open a locked door, or open a path by feeding too much Gordo Slime (very large version of Slime), Until they show up, you can too. However, as I mentioned before, people need to understand the world and slimes better.

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But it should also be said that the lack of direction and player choice does seem rather negative in a narrative sense, as it really feels like the game has no story worth mentioning at all. There are story moments, including dialogue with other characters, but for the most part it lacks gravity or any impact on gameplay. You’re there to farm and play with slime and that’s it.

Slime Rancher 2 is an absolutely lovely start to a promising sequel previewSlime Rancher 2 is an absolutely lovely start to a promising sequel preview

I’ll also say that the game does feel a little barren at the moment in terms of what it offers. Yes, it’s an EA/GP game, so there’s no reason to expect a 20+ hour narrative with side quests and other exploration and sim elements, but after just a few hours of streamlining my farming system and exploring the world, It’s clear that Rainbow Island currently has nothing to offer. Also, some analog systems feel a little unbalanced compared to what I’ve seen. Your health is something you rarely have to worry about, and it always seems to be draining energy due to running and using a stamina jetpack, which is even more frustrating as there are so many people who need to walk to and from remote parts of the island .

But still playing Slime Rancher 2 is an absolute pleasure. This game is relaxing, charming, cute, sweet and fun. It’s a title designed to make you smile, and like its predecessors, it never fails. I can’t wait to see the future of the Monomi Park sequel, and at this point, I’ll be returning to Rainbow Island to continue uncovering secrets and dealing with the lovable, speckled creatures that call it home.