Based on Reviews – Gamereactor – Grounded

Based on Reviews – Gamereactor – Grounded

This seems like the most tedious and predictable way to start a grounded review, but let’s talk about Honey’s 1989 film “I Shrink the Kids.” Under a very simple premise, a semi-intelligent scientist has inadvertently managed to shrink a group of children to a microscopic size, where they face the challenge of getting smaller in a generally safe and familiar environment.

This is exactly (minus Rick Moranis as a scientist) also grounded settings. Without further explanation, you—and a few friends, if you will—have shrunk and found yourself in the rather cozy backyard of an equally beautiful home. The only problem is that everything we normally don’t care about is now suddenly shut down. The straw turns into an almost alien-like forest, the tiny holes turn into interesting caves, and the creepy crawls need no further description.

Based on Reviews – Gamereactor – GroundedBased on Reviews – Gamereactor – Grounded
It could also be Honey’s drama “I Shrink the Kids”, which is certainly not a criticism, quite the opposite.

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Sure, we’ve been small in a lot of games before, but never in this complex way. Here, every aspect of the title depends on you being supermini, so the world feels big. How are you going to deal with this, especially since you also don’t know why this is happening?

In fact, I’ve been following the development of Grounded obsidian since its release to Early Access and Game Preview in the summer of 2020. Even so, it’s still a fun game, albeit with lots of issues and a bit of a struggle to pick up, and it feels a little shirtless. But now, more than two years later, it’s officially released, and it’s been a very gripping journey, and Obsidian Entertainment continues to add content and have an excellent conversation with their community.

Based on Reviews – Gamereactor – GroundedBased on Reviews – Gamereactor – Grounded
Resources need to be fixed and problems solved, which is easier said than done. Grounding often becomes very difficult.

So when you tap to start waking up and giving the word “small” a new meaning, an incredibly complete and smooth gaming experience awaits you. You see the house is far away, but how did you get there? Most importantly, how will you find food and water and make sure you have enough health and stamina? Grounded is what is now commonly referred to as the survival genre, and how you overcome the challenges you face is entirely up to you. There is a great opportunity to change your gameplay.

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As I wrote above, Grounded was a bit tricky during initial testing, but while there have been great improvements in this area, there is still too much when the various systems and how they relate to each other The motivation can be nourished and presented to you. . I want to state here and now that it pays to go all out because this is one of the funniest game worlds I’ve been to in a long, long time.

Based on Reviews – Gamereactor – GroundedBased on Reviews – Gamereactor – Grounded
Being a micro-architect and building a fort with good friends is as much fun as anything else.

The great thing about it is that the park you live in is free to explore – but pretty wild. Clearly, insect-sized humans have nothing to do here. This is in stark contrast to the fact that I am actually venturing behind the house I want to live in. It features bright, bold colors and a luxurious design that’s incredibly comfortable and beautiful. The world does live and breathe too, with animals moving around in what feels like a believable ecosystem. It also feels complex, something we’re not used to from the survival genre, and runs smoothly at 4K and 60 frames per second on the Xbox Series X.

However, most things are downright dangerous, no matter how beautiful they are, and I often have to rethink when something is proven great by giving it up or trying something completely different. As well as making better equipment so you can use it in any setting (like killing bed bugs to make gas masks). Explore mysterious ant tunnels, fight insects, avoid goldfish in fish ponds, and build night shelters, along with unexpected thrills. What’s more, there’s actually a story in the end game that barely contains the product, but it turns out to be a lot more interesting than I expected and worth exploring in depth. Of course, it’s basically about you getting back to normal size, but there’s actually more to it.

Based on Reviews – Gamereactor – GroundedBased on Reviews – Gamereactor – Grounded
The variety of environments is fantastic, and the game world is definitely the star of Grounded.

Grounded is great for solo play, and I’ve probably spent half my time playing the game. However, it really shines when you’re playing online with other people. Being able to do things together as a team makes things a lot more fun and I find myself feeling like many of the hardest challenges are designed for multiplayer and it’s more balanced that way and the fact that there are a lot of different elements really can do something as a team. The latter consists mostly of base buildings where you can build some really creative giant forts, rather than just stacking a few walls with the most important stuff as cover for the night.

Grounded has truly matured like a fine wine, and has been rewarded for two years in Early Access and Game Preview. Thanks to this, we have a great product today, a survival adventure that beats the competition from the start, both in content and technology. Granted, the difficulty levels are a bit uneven at times, and I still find the intro a little too steep, but in the end it’s a game that once again turns a 45-year-old man into a carefree teenager in a beautiful sandbox Medium adventure, can, and should be. , explore as much as you can, either alone or with a group of happy friends.